Blueberry Growing Tips for a Georgia Garden

Blueberry Bushes often sold in our local garden center stores will not grow here in Georgia—they are not able to tolerate our summer heat and humidity. There are several "Rabbiteye" varieties recommended for the Southeast. Highbush blueberries will not thrive in our area. When selecting blueberry plants for your garden, look for Becky Blue, Climax, Premier, Tifblue, or Woodard. For a good crop of berries, you will need 2 or more different varieties for cross-pollination. Although blueberry bushes normally occur in the woods, more berries will develop when the plants receive at least half a day of sun and plenty of water. The planting hole is important for getting the plant off to a good start. An effective planting method is to dig the hole twice as wide as the rootball and the same depth. Mix the soil with plenty of organic matter such as compost, manure, and peat moss. Place the plant in the planting hole and fill the hole completely with water before filling in with soil. After filling in around the roots with the amended soil, water again, and apply a thick layer of organic mulch to conserve moisture and keep the soil cool. Water weekly. You’ll be eating blueberries every year, as long as you get to them before the birds do!

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

this was very helpful in getting started on local GA blueberry bushes. thank you!

Anonymous said...

Not necessarily so about the highbush not being suitable for Georgia. I have about 100 bushes that have been growing for more than 20 years here in Paulding County, GA that are about 8 to 9 feet tall. Some years due to late spring freezes there aren't many berries but usually they are LOADED with berries. I don't know their exact type because my parents planted them, but from the little I have learned so far about blueberries, I believe they are highbush.

shadygardener said...

Like rabbiteye blueberries, highbush blueberries have many different cultivars and there are even two classifications: Northern Highbush and Southern Highbush. Farmers are in fact successfully growing some highbush varieties commercially. However, according to the experts at UGA, rabbiteye varieties are still the best choice for home gardeners in Georgia. For more information, a free publication is available at http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/C946/C946.htm

Anonymous said...

Do you need to have 2 or more for them to thrive and produce?

shadygardener said...

2 or more different varieties are needed for good cross-pollination which yields a good crop of berries.

Anonymous said...

When should one plant blueberry bushes? Is fall a good time?

Tony Wilson said...

Hey really wonderful blog.. i read your content i think it's very useful for us.. Thanks so much for your tips!! good job.. keep it up!!!

Hydrangea

Anonymous said...

i live in habersham county, north georgia.. which bush do you recommend..

Sharon Cowart said...

You could grow either Rabbiteye Blueberries or Southern Highbush.For more information, a free publication is available at http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/C946/C946.htm